Huggies New Plant Based Diapers Features Black Family For The First Time

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Submitted by Take Out on Mon, 07/15/2019 - 13:20

Huggies has released a new line of diapers that features a black family, a black father and daughter in its packaging. The move is said to be the ‘first in history’ as the company has exclusively shown white babies and parents in its advertising in the past. In a Facebook post, dad Joe Flowers Jr from Chicago, Illinois, U.S, applauded the brand for its new diversity. 

He wrote: ‘Huggies went and put a black father on the package of their diapers. This is a first in history, look how far we’ve come. I’m about to buy these for no reason whatsoever.’ The dad and daughter displayed on the box come as part of the new line of eco-friendly nappies.

Huggies is also introducing Huggies Special Delivery, what it calls its “most perfect diaper ever,” with a liner and waistband made from plant-based materials, including sugarcane, that provide better absorption and fit.

And in what might be considered an unusual marketing decision in the disposable diaper segment, Huggies Special Delivery packaging is black, making the product stand out in a sea of white and pastel packaging that other brands use. The advertising also relies on black-and-white imagery.

The diapers are free of parabens, fragrance and “elemental chlorine,” and “dermatologically tested and clinically proven hypoallergenic,” according to the company. Huggies’ “wetness indicator” helps parents know when it’s time for a change. They also come with a variety of designs the company says follow “contemporary market trends.”

The commercials emphasize that Special Delivery is for parents who believe the “perfect way to care for your baby is your own way,” regardless of what the “five million parenting search results say.”

The multibillion-dollar disposable diaper market is dominated worldwide by two brands: Procter & Gamble's Pampers and Kimberly-Clark's Huggies.  It’s a tricky market. As the nation ages, much of the growth is coming from the sale of adult diapers.

In recent years, because of environmental and health concerns, some parents have turned back to washable, cloth diapers but some studies say the water, detergent and energy consumed to clean them has its own environmental downside.